Princess Jasmine steals spotlight in Aladdin

Disney’s latest female protagonist Princess Jasmine (Naomi Scott) is a modern-day powerhouse as she enters a whole new world in Guy Ritchie’s live-action remake of Aladdin.

The Princess of Agrabah returns to the big screen alongside Aladdin (Mena Massoud) to bring Disney’s animated classic to life with a freshness that fits the times.

Unlike the original 1992 film, the updated version gives the Arab princess a role as significant as her love interest and the movie’s title character.

The audience first meets Jasmine disguised as a commoner in the marketplace before Aladdin’s quick wits save her from being prosecuted from stealing.

On face value, she is a ‘damsel in distress’ rescued by a man, but upon her return to the palace, her true colours are shown when she is courted by yet another prince (Billy Magnussen) wanting to marry her.

She is strong-willed and bold, believing in her own ability to rule the kingdom without another by her side.

Disney’s princess culture has been criticised for being harmful towards young girls and promoting gender stereotypes.

But Jasmine is a great role model; she is ambitious in her hopes for herself and does not stop fighting for the freedom of choice in a place where the odds are against her.

She is respectful even when she disagrees with the Sultan, and empathetic and compassionate to the subjects of her kingdom.

The princess’ wardrobe in the film is vibrant, beautiful and includes her iconic blue-green two-piece, which is given a more modest makeover in the film negating views from the original movie that she is oversexualised.

Image: Disney

Princess Jasmine has an admirable depth to her and a character arc that is an enhanced reminiscent version of the character we already know and if you did not already, fall in love with.

Naomi Scott embodies Jasmine’s beauty inside and out. 

A pivotal moment is when she sings original song and feminist anthem, ‘Speechless’, about not staying silent and instead, speaking out against injustices regardless of the obstacles thrown your way.

Genie mentions early in the film, “The more wishes you have, the more you want.” 

Aladdin shows everyone young and old how there is more to life than power and fortune.

The film reminds its audience there is magic in friendship and staying true to yourself.  

The classic remake features original characters Genie (Will Smith), Jafar (Marwan Kenzari), Abu and Rajah, as well as its hit musical numbers like Friend Like Me, Prince Ali, and favourite A Whole New World.

Disney’s live-action Aladdin is in cinemas now.

We Are Sisters, We Stick Together 


I’m going to be honest, I love being a girl but it’s a difficult task.  I attended a conference exclusively for senior high school girls with the hopes of choosing the path to empowerment, boldness, resilience and beauty.

If you ever get the chance to listen to Vita Adam do a motivational speech, DO LISTEN! She’s a very inspiring lady whose vibe is just so energising. ❤ She reinforced all the very important issues and challenges we face and encouraged us to change the world.

To be BOLD is to be strong, confident, fearless but most importantly, courageous. Being bold in a society that’s constantly trying to confine us and push that we’re not good enough is a challenge.  If you want to try something, just have a go! If you want to try different hobbies or sports or food, just do it!  And don’t do it for others but for yourself. You can only fail if you don’t try.

Words are very powerful, especially names, and have either a positive or negative impact on us. The more they’re repeated, the more you believe them. I try to refrain from using negative and degrading language about other people both male and female, and also myself because it does nothing but make yourself look and feel bad. When asked to list the various good and bad things we call others and ourselves, I was honestly shocked by the amount of terrible and sad words girls call other girls, their ‘friends’, and themselves. I call my friends sugar, honey, babe, darling or just a nickname derived from his/her actual name.  Last year I also came to terms with myself and promised to only speak positively about myself, however not arrogantly. Even as a joke I really don’t see any humour in calling friends s1uts, b*tche$, id!ots or fat. Some people, maybe even some of you are thinking that I’m way too serious or can’t take a joke but that’s just proof of the belittling culture we live in. Why is it more common to find girls calling each other names with horrible definitions compared to kind positive names?

By us females calling each other certain names, we are also giving men permission to do so. We’re always trying to straighten up the guys and teach them to respect girls but we must start with each other. Like the Cheetah Girls said, “We are sisters, we stand together. We make up one big family, though we don’t look the same.” Girls, we have to look out for each other all the time.  Changing the world starts with you. Sure, the entire world isn’t going to change in an instant because we treat each other kinder but it’s a step in the right direction. No one is perfect and it’s natural to make mistakes but we need to practise a healthy culture, which includes a positive sisterhood, not only for ourselves but for younger girls – those who admire and look to us for guidance and as role models.

We are a beautiful specimen just as are males. Each one of us is unique, smart, and important. We must always remember to have courage and be kind.  It takes a strong wave to go against the current but we all have that power and can be amazing people. 

“Where there is woman, there is magic.” Ntozake Shange